I LOVE No SEW Pant Hooks

Hey Everyone,

I had to take a break from getting ready to go to the National ASG Conference to show you how excellent it is to put in no sew pant hooks…. They are so fast and easy to put in, let me show you how.

photoIf you didn’t interface the waistband/waistband facing you’ll need to stabilize the right and left ends of the waistband.  This fusible interfacing serves two purposes.  Fuse small pieces on both the wrong side of the waistband and the facing.  The interfacing will support the fabric where the hook and bar are installed and protect the opposite pieces from wear.  So for example, on the right end of the waistband, the interfacing on the waistband facing will support the hooks.  The interfacing on the waistband will protect the waistband from the back side of the metal hardware that will be up against the wrong side of the waistband.  I like to fuse a double layer of interfacing.

photo 3-4

Start on the side of  the waistband that is above the front fly topstitching. (This side of the waistband overlaps the other side.)  Mark the position of the hooks on the waistband facing.  Keep in mind that the metal hardware will extend a little bit toward the end of the waistband, so position it far enough from the folded end…approximately 3/8″ from the folded end.

Mark the position of the hooks

Mark the position of the hooks

Push the spikes on the wrong side of the hook through the facing

Push the spikes on the wrong side of the hook through the facing

Position the hook along the guideline.  Push the spikes on the back side of the hook through the facing (and fused interfacing).   When I am using two hooks, I like to position the lower one 5/8″ from the bottom edge of the facing, and the hop one 1/4″ from the top edge of the facing.

photo 2-4Here’s a photo showing the wrong side of the waistband facing.  The spikes on the back of the hook are pushed through to the wrong side.

Put on the backing for the hook

Put on the backing for the hook

The next step is to slip the hook backing into the spikes.  Here’s a photo of the backing that fits onto the spikes.  Notice that it is indented so the spikes and be pressed flush against the backing.  Make sure that you position the backing with the indentations facing out.

Use needle nose pliers to bend the spikes down

Use needle nose pliers to bend the spikes down

Use needle nose pliers to bend the spikes down and press them firmly into the indentations.  Bend the single spike so that it’s pointing away from the other two.

photo 1-2Here’s a close-up of the backing with all the spikes pressed into the indentations.

photo 1-4Here is what the facing looks like after both pant hooks have been installed.

Bend back the overlapping side of the waistband to see where to position the bars

Bend back the overlapping side of the waistband to see where to position the bars

The next step is to zip up the zipper and mark the position of the bars on the opposite of the waistband. Bend the end of the waistband back so you can see the hooks.  Mark the positions of the bars on the right side of the waistband as shown above. The bars should be positioned so the line up with the very back edge of the hooks.   Align the bars with the guidelines that you marked.  Then slip the backings on and bend the spikes in toward the center to secure them to the waistband.

photoUsing these no sew pant hooks really give your pants that ready-to-wear look.  Plus, I can attest to how well they hold up because I’ve been wearing my new shorts almost every day, and the hook is staying in place like a champ (…super impressive because I only used one hook for the shorts!!)

So I’m working on a sleeveless fitted shirt to wear while teaching my fitted shirt workshop at the ASG Conference… hoping to finish a pair of Khaki pants to go with it ….  Very exciting stuff, stay tuned!  Happy Sewing.

 

 

Simple Front Fly Construction and Better than Ready-to-Wear Fit!!

Hey everyone,   I’m in shorts fitting heaven!   I finished my shorts…and my pants and I’m thrilled with the fit.   As you can see, these shorts already look lived in.  I can sit and stand with out any sliding around (the back waistband stays comfortably in place.)  Plus, they have a nice relaxed fit…no pressing on my belly.

Front View

Front View

One of the things that can affect the overall fit and appearance of your pants or shorts is how the front fly is constructed.   I’ve been paying close attention to each step as I put the fly together. Here are a few tips.

inside view of right fly piece

inside view of fly …Left fly piece is positioned on top of right fly piece

Here is a view of the fly after both fly pieces and the zipper have been sewn in.This photo shows a few things that help make a nice flat fly.  First notice that the zipper has been sewn to the left fly piece twice (The two rows of stitching just to the right of the front crotch seam).  This helps keep the zipper nice and flat and securely attached to the left fly piece.  You can also see that the front crotch seam connects aligns perfectly with the seam that sewed on the left fly piece.  This creates a smooth transition from the crotch seam to the base of  the fly.   I also think starting with simple rectangle shapes for the fly pieces make it easy to sew them together.      Notice how the right fly piece is slightly wider than the left fly.  That way, when the pieces are laying in position, the right fly piece will completely cover the left fly piece for a nice neat view.

Right fly piece

Right fly piece

Here’s an inside view of the fly with the pieces  positioned as they should be when you are wearing your pants.    Notice that the right fly piece is only partially attached to the right leg.  The bottom 1 1/2″ of the right fly piece is left free.  This is so you can fold it out of the way when you’re topstitching the fly.

photo 4

Inside view with right fly folded out of the way

Here’s a photo of the front fly after the fly has been topstitched.  This shows a few things.  First, while you’re probably concerned with how the topstitched fly looks from the right side (I’ll show you that in a minute)…it’s also important on the wrong side of your pants.  Notice how the topstitched fly detail anchors the left fly to the front of the pant.  It also catches the outside end of the zipper twill tape.  The left fly piece is now secured nice and flat against the front leg.   If you’re working with stretchy fabric or light weight fabric you can fuse some interfacing to the wrong side of the left fly piece to make it more stable before you stitch it onto the left leg.  The second thing I want to show you is why it’s important to be able to fold the right fly piece out of the way when you’re topstitching the fly.  Notice that the base of the topstitching ends right at the top of the front crotch seam.  If the right fly was laying flat in position, you would have to sew over it.  This makes it hard to get a nice smooth topstitched fly.  Plus the right fly will not lay flat when it’s folded over the left fly piece.

Here's the fly from the right side

Here’s the fly from the right side

Here’s a close-up of the front fly topstitching.  Notice how nice and flat it is at the base of the fly.  You can barely tell when the front crotch seam stops and the fly opening starts.

Stay tuned for a tutorial on how to finish the waistband for a nice clean finish… I’ll show you how to use NO SEW pant closures.   No button or buttonholes required!!

 

 

And the Fitting Goes On…

Hi Everyone,  I hope you all had a Happy 4th… I know if you live near me in Connecticut you probably got a little rain.  We still went to my Brother’s picnic and I had a great time participating in my yearly game of Croquette… (We play with my Grandparents beautiful wooden set that’s older than me!)  …I was the last one to get knocked out :)    Anyway, before and after the picnic, I have been working on my pants.  It’s really interesting to me that there are subtle differences between fitting and fine tuning pants vs. jeans.    Many of the jean adjustments that I’ve used to get great results work well with pants… but I have some lingering things that I need to get right.  Below is a pic of me in my favorite pair of shorts… basically they are my favorite because they are now the only pair I own that do not squeeze me when I’m wearing them.   Sadly, I’ve worn them on a couple of fishing trips with my husband and they are starting to look yucky…  (because I fell down a few times and made contact with the bottom of the river :)

Check out the wrinkles and the way these shorts fit…

 

My favorite shorts

My favorite shorts

Now check out how my pants are fitting…

Pants as they are...

Pants as they are…

I’m getting really close.  I did fix the “too much fabric along the front crotch” issue that I was having…   Here’s how I did that.

Pattern adjustment

Pattern adjustment

 

I slashed the pattern vertically…and horizontally right above the front crotch curve.  Then I pleated out about 1/2″ along the vertical slash and 1/4″ along the horizontal slash.  I did this on my shorts pattern piece… so I didn’t have to true-up the inseam.   I will show you how to do this adjustment to pants later.

I posted my shorts so you can see what my goal is…  I have made a number of changes to my pants.  I’m going to transfer all of adjustments to my pant pattern and cut out another pair to see where I am.

Here’s a peek at some of the things I did to my pants.  I felt that my rise was too long… and that I had excess fabric in the crotch.  If you are trying to fit a pair of pants that are already cut out and sewn together, you can take the inseam apart and offset the seam to take length out of either the front or back crotch…  It can be tricky to decide when crotch point needs to be shortened… If you think the inseam is in a good position, shorten the back crotch point to take out the excess… Because if you shorten the front crotch point, the inseam may pull too far forward….

Shorten back crotch point and take in inseam slightly

Shorten back crotch point and take in inseam slightly

Here’s a photo of my crotch… You can see that I offset the inseam so that the back crotch extended about a 3/4″

Here's how the inseam looks

Here’s how the inseam looks

From this view you can see that I took out a fair amount of the inseam too.  They did fit better after I did this adjustment, but I created another fitting issue.  The inseam between the crotch point and the knee notch is too short in the back when I compared it to the front inseam.  So I pleated out some of the length in the front inseam…  That’s when I realized that these pants were going to be sacrificed in the name of fitting perfection.

Pleat out excess length along front inseam

Pleat out excess length along front inseam

I put the inseams together and pinched out the amount I needed to remove.  Then I sewed a horizontal dart across the front leg.    You can see that it would not be attractive to do this to pants that you are planning on wearing.  Even though I cut out some nice khaki fabric to make these pants, I don’t feel bad about “wrecking” them because I learned a lot.  I can’t wait to transfer all the changes to my pattern and cut them out again!  Stay tuned :)

 

 

Bobbin Buddies make my hippo a happy boy!

Hey everyone, …working on my pants.  I can’t wait to share my final answer results.  Now that the weather is so warm, I feel like I need to be hyper organized… clutter seems to make my studio hotter!   I got this cute hippo bobbin holder during one of my visits to the Charlton Sewing Center in Charlton Mass.  I like it because I can keep bobbins that are wound with thread for current projects at my finger tips.  But as you can see Mr. Hippo does not keep them neat!  You can see that he’s busy building an impressive thread nest when I’m not watching :)

Mr Hippo building a thread nest

Mr Hippo building a thread nest

Here’s a fix for this mess…. Bobbin Buddies.  These soft rubber clips slid over the thread to keep the tails from unwinding!  They are so flexible that they will fit onto your bobbin no matter how full it is…  They are also slim enough to fit around every bobbin I have… (Pfaff and Bernina bobbins are more narrow than Janome and Viking bobbins.

Bobbin Buddies

Bobbin Buddies

After you slip the Bobbin Buddie onto the bobbin, rotate it until it covered the thread tail to make sure it’s nice and secure.

Bobbin Buddies in action

Bobbin Buddies in action

So, I took a break from constructing the front fly that I was working on to give Mr Hippo a makeover… Definitely much better (my studio seems cooler already :)

Mr. Hippo enjoying Bobbin Buddies

Mr. Hippo enjoying Bobbin Buddies

In addition to organizing my bobbin holder, I also when to my thread boxes and secured all the bobbins I have stored in them.  When I finish a project, I’ll store the bobbin with the leftover thread… That way I don’t have to wind a bobbin (or search for it) when I need to use that color thread again.   I’m feeling very happy and organized!

Neat Thread Box

Neat Thread Box

Here comes the crotch fitting!!!

Hi Everyone,   They’re getting there…  Very comfortable, but I have some extra fabric along the front crotch seam.  Depending how I’m standing this extra is not noticeable… but I know it’s there.  …Plus, I was in a hurry to sew these (or maybe it was the heat and humidity) but I topstitched the fly from the waist to the base of the curve and I got that extra “bubble” at the bottom of the fly.  … Do what I say, not what I do comes to mind… Here’s the Topstitching Tip for the front fly that I posted earlier!

photoIt’s hard to see in the above photo, but I also think I may have a little excess in the back crotch too…  If you check out the back pattern piece when it’s laying flat, the back crotch curve/inseam does seem to stick out pretty far…  Maybe I can take it in a little bit too.

Getting back to my front view…To see what would happen, I took the inseam in a little bit at the hem…

Take in the inseam

Take in the inseam

This did not improve the front view… but it did highlight the excess fabric that’s bugging me.

Front view with Inseam taken in

Front view with Inseam taken in

Yucky… I let the seam back out!   When I was working on the Straight Lady Jeans, I had a similar fitting issue, and I adjusted the front leg pattern piece by slashing it in two directions along the front crotch and pleating out some excess in the from crotch…. Of course, I’m so organized that I’ve already put that adjusted jean pattern away… I’m going to dig it out and see if it will help my shorts.

I want to take a minute and talk about the fitting process…  It can be frustrating and it can take a few versions to work out all the “bugs”  The first pair of pants I made with this pattern came out great, and the front crotch looked good.  Now, I’m not loving the way it’s fitting. Maybe it’s more noticeable because they are shorts… Anyway, If you’re working on a fitting project, remember to be patient with yourself!!!!!

 

Here come the Shorts!

Hey Everyone,

Summer has definitely arrived… it’s soooo hot today.  If I could figure out how to float in my pool and sew at the same time, I’d be all set :)   Back to working on samples for the upcoming ASG National Conference where I’ll be teaching at the end of July.  The weather has inspired me to make a pair of shorts along side the pants I’m working on.  I discovered that if you plan ahead and cut your pieces out thrifty style, you may have enough to get shorts out of the same yardage you purchased for pants…. I started with 2 yards of twill and I was able to cut out shorts with the “scraps”.

Cut out shorts from the scraps

Cut out shorts from the scraps

Let me show you how to draft a shorts from your fitted pants pattern.  …Depending on the length and style of the shorts your making, you may be able to simply chop them off at the  length you want.  For example if you’re making Bermuda or Clam Diggers (I love that name :)   You can measure down the side and inseams and shorten your pants to make shorts.

Trace the front leg

Trace the front leg

But if you’re making short shorts… not Daisy Dukes… but short, you need to make some simple changes to the pant pattern.  Trace the top portion of the front and back leg pieces.  Measure down the side seam edges so you can mark and equal length front and back.  Here’s my front leg pattern piece.

Trace back leg

Trace back leg

…and here’s the traced back leg.  Notice that the side seam is shaped to hug the hip and top of the thigh.  If I cut my shorts out with the pattern as is… I would have a nice pair of snugly fitting shorts.  This works if they extend down past my thighs to my knee… But I don’t want snug short shorts.  Let’s look at the adjustments for the front leg.

Adjusted front leg

Adjusted front leg

So, the first thing I did was straighten the side seam from the fullest hip level.  Then I checked the inseam.  It was already pretty straight so I didn’t need to adjust it.

Close up of the side seam on the front leg

Close up of the side seam on the front leg

Draw in a 90 degree angle guide at the intersection of the side and hem.   If the hem edge is at an angle that’s significantly greater or less than 90 degrees, the hem will be pointed or dipped in at the side seam when the front and back legs are sewn together.  If this angle approximates 90 degrees it will sew together creating a straight hem under the side seam.   The reason why it’s important to check this when you’re making short shorts is that the hem may not run straight across from side to inseam on the front leg.  Let me show you why.

compare the front and back legsBecause the back crotch curve extends lower than the front crotch curve, you can’t draw a level straight edge for the hem on the front leg.  If you did, the front inseam would be longer than the back inseam.

Back leg

Back leg

You can draw a relatively straight hem on the back leg because the inseam and side seam are approximately level with each other.  The side and inseams need to be reshaped.

Back side seam edge

Back side seam edge

I straightened the side seam from the full hip.  In this case, when I drew a straight line from the full hip it added an 1 1/2″ to the width of the pattern piece (the outer line).  I though that was a bit much, so I brought the side seam in 1/2″.   You can see that I still have a 90 degree angle after moving the line in.   Now I’m adding an inch to the side edge, I think that’s enough.

Back inseam

Back inseam

I decided to straighten the inseam slightly along the inseam.  I extended the hem edge 1/4″.

So, now I have a short pattern that will hang straight from my full hip.  Hoping for comfy khaki shorts :) The back legs with welt pockets are already sewn together… I’m off to tackle the front fly zipper.  Stay tuned for the final results!  Happy summer day.

 

I’m not saying Goodbye to my Dear Friend John

johnHi Everyone… Sorry for not posting during the past week or so, it’s been a rough couple of weeks.  My very dear friend John past away last week.  He was such an amazing person, I’m still trying to wrap my head around it.

I met John at Manchester Sewing Center way back when we were in the old store.  He came in to buy a sewing machine.  We instantly became fast friends.  After getting his new embroidery machine, he frequently came in to take a class… or just visit.  Over the years he collected a machine from almost every brand that we carried… and participated in the various sewing clubs like Pfaff Club and Janome Club.  He was an amazing quilter, sewer and he even taught himself to knit beautiful sweaters.

After the store closed in 2008, we remained close friends.  We shared our love for sewing, working on projects together, going out to dinner and talking on the phone.  At the same time he was dealing with kidney failure and eventually he needed dialysis three times a week.  He lost toes and ended up living at a rehab facility for nearly 2 years.   During his stay, he remained amazing.  I would pick him up for field trips… shopping and going out to eat. He started working on a new sweater and spent a lot of time reading and plotting his escape from the rehab.

I had the honor of picking him up and helping him move to his new apartment in Avon, CT this past May.  I will always cherish the memory of driving through the beautiful back roads from Bloomfield to Avon, windows rolled down so the wind was in our hair and the smell of fresh flowers followed us all the way…

He ended up in the hospital for a seemingly non-threatening health issue.  Things didn’t go well and he ended up in the ICU.  I was blessed to have the opportunity to really get to know his sister and brother-in-law during visits at the hospital.  John was so lucky to have such a nice family.  We were with him, when he past away… It was peaceful and a blessing.   He is in heaven watching over us… (thank god, I need all the help I can get!)

Now, as I help his sister clean out his apartment I’m finding so many treasures that he created… quilts, garments, embroidery projects and knitting.  He was so talented.   One of the things that I found was a half knitted V-Neck Sweater…  in the future I see a felted wool bag… the shoulders forming the straps…

I will always hold memories of John close to my heart…

 

Pattern adjustments for Straight Lady Jean Pattern–Update on grainline

Hey everyone,

Ok, so I’m discovering that some of the things I do to adjust a jean pattern with a curved side seam do not work if the side seam is straight… I tried to straighten the grainline by creating a horizontal dart to take up some of the length along the side seam… Sometimes you can pin an adjustment in a fit muslin, but it doesn’t translate after the adjustment has been transferred to the actually pattern pieces.  Working with this pattern is a new adventure for me because I’m limited by the straight edge along the sides seams.

 

I added strips of muslin along the inseam to let them out

I added strips of muslin along the inseam to let them out

When I tried the new muslin on Marie, the grainline was just as twisted as it was before I adjusted it :(  I sat there and thought about it for a minute.  Pinning things is one way to get the muslin to tell you how to fix it… another is to let it go free.    I decided to let the entire inseam out  from one knee notch through the crotch to the opposite knee notch.  That way I could see if the grainline hung straight when only the side seam was sewn.  I could also tell if there was enough room along the inseam. With the inseams hanging free (and slightly breezy…Marie was an excellent sport) the grainline hung straight.  When I tried to close the inseam, the grain was pulled off.  Then I gently encouraged the back and front inseams to meet.  Keeeping the grainline straight, I ended up with a 2″ gap between the front and back raw edges of the inseam.

Close-up of front crotch

Close-up of front crotch

 

To figure out how much I really needed to add to the inseams, Marie sewed strips of muslin to the inseams after taking the front and back crotch seams apart.  Above you can see that the front crotch seam was sewn  back together after the strips were added.  This extended the front crotch (we repeated this along the back inseams too).  Then Marie put the muslin back on and I pinned the inseam back together.  The dashed green line is the new inseam sew line.

I would love to say that this completely fixed the pattern. But, there are a few other issues I have to deal with in the back.  Here’s my theory/action plan.  I think grading only works so far.  I think I need to reshape the back crotch and inseam to get a good fit on Marie.  So I am going to take the size 16 and 18 off my Straight Lady Jean Pattern and produce that for sizes 6-14.  Then I’m going to continue to fine-tune the size 16 so I can produce a women’s sized pattern too!

 

 

 

Pattern Adjustments for the Straight Lady Jean Pattern

Hey Everyone,

I hope you all had a great Father’s Day Weekend!   … I had brunch with my Dad, then spent the day fly fishing with my husband…so much fun :)  (I tried to take  a picture of the fish I caught… but he was so slippery, I couldn’t hold onto him long enough!

I love the fact that every day when I wake up and have lots of choices… Depending on how I’m feeling, I can do pattern work, sewing samples, outlining video classes, shooting video…. etc… Today was  a pattern work kinda morning.  Before I release my Straight Lady Jean Pattern …aka Japanese Denim Jean Pattern, I want to spend some time working with it.  I had my friend Marie try on the size 16.  Happy to report that it’s very close right out of the envelop.  There are a few fitting issues that need to be addressed before we can cut it out of denim.   Today I want to show you how I think I’m going to straighten the grainline. You can see that the grainline twists from side seam toward inseam as it goes down toward the hem.  This is a body specific fitting issue.  I tried on some of the muslins on a couple of other friends and the grainline hung straight.

twisted grainline

twisted grainline

Essentially, I needed to pick up the fabric along the side seam to straighten the grainline.  To try this on the muslin,  I pinned a horizontal dart starting at the side seam and ending at the inseam (taking out 0).  There is an identical dart on the back leg as well.

Pin out fabric to straighten the grainline

Pin out fabric to straighten the grainline

Now the question is, how to I transfer this fitting adjustment to the pattern pieces….remember the side seam is straight.   I can’t just dart out the paper like I can with a shaped side seam…  To prove it to myself, I tried it.  When I pleated the pattern along the guidelines below, it caused the side seam above the adjustment to poke out to the right.  The top of the side seam extended almost a full inch past it’s original position, making it impossible to cut out along the selvage edge of the fabric.  I played with truing it up.  I couldn’t come up with a final answer that I liked…

I tried darting out the paper two different ways

I tried darting out the paper two different ways

So, instead of darting out the wedge of paper that I need to straighten the grainline, I’m going to try taking it off at the top of the pattern pieces.

Take it off at the top of the pattern pieces

Take it off at the top of the pattern pieces

Before I adjusted the leg pattern pieces, I traced a copy of the front pocket bag/facing and positioned it in place on top of the front leg.  Then I marked the wedge of paper that needs to be taken off the top of the legs.    It’s easy to see that the side seams will still match, because I took off an equal 1″ off the side seam edges of both the front and back pieces.   It will also be easy to adjust the front pocket pieces because I marked the adjustment on the top of the front pocket bag pattern piece as well.

I’m gong to stitch up a new muslin and have Marie try it on… Hope that this will straighten the grainline… stay tuned :)

 

Pants Love–Capris with a drawstring hem for summer

Hey Everyone,

I just took my finished capri pants out of the dryer… I’m in LOVE because I can pull off the “cute”  drawstring hem without looking silly.  I’m not a petite lady… I have big bones which makes it hard for me to add ruffles and other design details that I really admire when I see them on someone who can pull them off…  (Hippo in a tutu comes to mind :)

Drawstring hem

Drawstring hem

 

This is my first finished pair of pants…After I fixed the back view.  I really should have made a “standard” pair for the pattern cover…and my new workshop brochure that I’m working on.  But I really wanted to make a pair that I would be able to wear during the summer… I’ll get to those next week.  I decided to add a drawstring around the hem to give the straight leg some pizazz :)

 

First I determined  the finished length, clean finished the hem with the serger and folded under a 1 1/2″ hem.  Mark the position of the buttonholes so that they are 1/4″ from the folded edge of the hem as shown.  Choose a buttonhole on your sewing machine that is 1/2″ long.  Fuse a piece of interfacing to the wrong side of the buttonhole guidelines to reinforce the fabric. Before stitching the buttonholes, I recommend doing a sample on a scrap to make sure you’re happy with the size (length and width) of the hole.

Mark the position of buttonholes

Mark the position of buttonholes

After the buttonholes are stitched, apply so sort of non fray liquid… Such as Fray Check before cutting them open.  One word of caution…After the Fray Check dries… it may show on the fabric, so test it on a scrap first.

Pin the drawstring to the wrong side of the hem

Pin the drawstring to the wrong side of the hem

You can sew the hem to create a casing for the drawstring and feed the drawstring in one buttonhole – through the hem- and back out the second buttonhole.   ….Or, try this time saving tip.  After the buttonholes are cut open, stick the ends of the drawstrings through front the wrong side.  Pull the drawstring so that it’s snug against the fabric and positioned close to the fold along the base of the hem.    Pin the drawstring in place from the right side of the hem. (If you pin the drawstring to the hem from the wrong side, the pins will end up inside the casing with the drawstring!)  After the drawstring is anchored in place, fold the hem up.  Pin the hem from the right side.

Sew along top of the hem from the right side

Sew along top of the hem from the right side

Sew the hem to create a casing for the drawstring.  The trick to making this step easy is to make sure that  your hem is an even depth all the way around the hem.  My hem is 1 1/2″ deep.  So I know I can sew 1 1/4″ from the folded edge AND catch the hem from the wrong side.  Start above the buttonholes, making sure the ends of the drawstring is not in the way.  The drawstring should be down near the folded edge of the hem, so you can stitch around the top of the hem without catching it.   I created a double topstitched hem by stitching around a second time 1/4″ away from my first row of stitching.

Finished Hem

Finished Hem

 

After I finished the hem, I knotted the ends of the drawstrings and threw them in the wash.   …I think these are my new favorite pair of capris.  Definitely wearing them when I go to NYC garment district on Monday!!!